World Affairs Council of Hilton Head

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  • Mathew Burrows: Russia and China: Benign Friendship or Malignant Gamechanger?

Mathew Burrows: Russia and China: Benign Friendship or Malignant Gamechanger?

  • 23 Oct 2020
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • 540 William Hilton Pkwy, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928

Registration

  • A member may bring up to 4 guests to a speaker meeting at $10 per guest.
  • Non members are allowed to register for up to 2 meetings per year; they may also bring one guest.

Abstract

Recent years have seen the old Communist enemies grow closer five decades after Kissinger’s opening to China.  Are we back to a new Cold War with the US and the West facing an united Russo-China front?  Both Moscow and Beijing share a deep resentment against Washington, propounding an alternative vision of a non-US-dominated world order.  But, in a switch, is Moscow willing to be the junior partner to China?  Or is the growing friendship a tactical move until Russian sanctions are dropped and China attains better terms with the US?  A real alliance or a marriage of convenience?

Biography

Matthew BurrowsDr. Mathew J. Burrows serves as the director of the Atlantic Council’s Foresight, Strategy, and Risks Initiative in the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security. He was appointed counselor to the National Intelligence Council (NIC) in 2007 and director of the Analysis and Production Staff (APS) in 2010. As director of APS, Burrows was responsible for managing a staff of senior analysts and production technicians who guide and shepherd all NIC products from inception to dissemination. He was the principal drafter for the NIC publication Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds, which received widespread recognition and praise in the international media and among academics and think tanks. In 2005, he was asked to set up and direct the NIC’s new Long Range Analysis Unit, which is now known as the Strategic Futures Group.

Burrows joined the CIA in 1986, where he served as analyst for the Directorate of Intelligence (DI), covering Western Europe, including the development of European institutions such as the European Union. From 1998 to 1999 he was the first holder of the intelligence community fellowship and served at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Other previous positions included assignments as special assistant to the US UN Ambassador Richard Holbrooke (1999-2001) and Deputy National Security Advisor to US Treasury Secretary Paul O’Neill (2001-02). He is a member of the DI’s Senior Analyst Service.

Burrows graduated from Wesleyan University in 1976 and received a PhD in European history from Cambridge University, England in 1983.


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